For Steadfastness

In all that you require me to do,
grant me the knowledge,
the desire and the ability,
that I may so fulfill it as I ought,
and may make my path to you.
I pray,
keep me safe, straightforward, and perfect to the end.

Give me, O Lord, a steadfast heart,
which no unworthy affection may drag downwards;
give me an unconquered heart,
which no tribulation can wear out;
give me an upright heart,
which no unworthy purpose may tempt aside.

Bestow on me also, O Lord my God,
understanding to know you,
diligence to seek you,
wisdom to find you,
and a faithfulness that may finally embrace you. Amen.

Source: Thomas Aquinas, d. 1274
Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Middle Ages, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1954.

Daily Prayer

Grant me,
O merciful God,
to study prudently,
to understand rightly,
and to fulfill whatever is pleasing to you perfectly,
to the praise and glory of your name.

You are the King of glory, O Christ.
You are the everlasting Son of the Father.

Source: Thomas Aquinas, d. 1274
Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Middle Ages, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1954.

Praise and Guidance

Almighty, most holy,
most high, and supreme God,
highest good, all good, wholly good,
you alone are good,
to you we render all praise, all glory,
all thanks, all honor, all blessing,
and we shall always ascribe all good to you.

Almighty, eternal, just, and merciful God,
help us wretches to do for you
what we know is your will
and always desire whatever is pleasing to you.
Purify us within, enlighten us within,
kindle us with the flame of your Holy Spirit,
so we may be able to follow in the footsteps of your Son,
our Lord Jesus Christ,
and by your grace alone
come to you, the Most High,
who in perfect Trinity and simple unity lives and reigns and glorifies God Almighty for ever and ever. Amen.

Source: Francis of Assisi, 13th Century
Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Middle Ages, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1954.

Thanks

Almighty, most holy, most high and supreme God,
holy and just Father,
Lord, king of heaven and earth,
we give thanks to you because by your holy will,
and by your only Son
you created all things spiritual and corporal in the Holy Spirit,
made us in your image and likeness and placed us in paradise,
where we fell by our own fault.
We give you thanks
that just as you created us by your Son,
so by your true and holy love,
you sent him as true God and true man,
to be born….
And we give you thanks because your Son himself
will come again in the glory of his Majesty
… to say to all who have known you and adored you,
and served you in repentance:
“Come, you who are blessed by my Father,
inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world.”
Since we wretches and sinners are not worthy to name you,
we humbly pray
that our Lord Jesus Christ,
your beloved Son
in whom you are well pleased,
together with the Holy Spirit,
the Counselor,
may give thanks to you as it is pleasing to you. 
Amen.

Source: Francis of Assisi, 13th Century
Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Middle Ages, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1954.

For Knowledge of God’s Will

God,
almighty, eternal, righteous, and merciful,
help us poor sinners do all that we know of your will,
and to will always what pleases you,
so that inwardly purified, enlightened, and kindled
by the fire of the Holy Spirit,
we may follow in the footprints of your well-beloved Son,
our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen.

Source: Francis of Assisi, 13th Century
Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Middle Ages, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1954.

Daily Prayer of St. Francis

My God and my all,
who are you,
sweetest Lord, my God?
And who am I,
a poor worm,
your servant?
Holiest Lord, I would love you!
Sweetest Lord, I would love you!
Lord, my God,
I give you all my heart and body,
and earnestly desire,
to know how to do more for your love. Amen.

Source: Francis of Assisi, 13th Century
Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Middle Ages, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1954.

Alexander’s Breastplate

This lorica (breastplate) prayer is called “Alexander’s Breastplate” because it is between two poems about Alexander the Great in the Welsh Book of Taliesin.

On the face of the earth
his equal was not born,
Three persons of God,
one gentle Son
in the glorious Trinity.
Son of the Godhead,
Son of the Manhood,
one wonderful Son.
Son of God, a fortress,
Son of the blessed Mary,
Son, Servant, Lord.
Great his destiny,
great God supreme,
in heavenly glory.
Of the race of Adam
and Abraham,
and of the line of David,
the eloquent psalmist,
was he born.
By a word he healed
the blind and deaf
from every ailment;
the gluttonous, vain
iniquitous, vile, perverse,
to rise toward the Trinity
by their redemption.
The Cross of Christ
is our shining breastplate
against every ailment.
Against every hardship
may it certainly be
our city of refuge.

Source: Book of Taliesin, Welsh, 10th-14th Century, excerpt
The Four Ancient Books of Wales, 1868, p. 557-558.

Source of this version: Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church.

Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church is a collection of prayers from the time of Patrick (d. ca. 460-493) to the Synod of Whitby (664), and also from the Celtic Christian tradition that remained after Whitby. A few of the prayers in this book may be familiar from their appearance in other prayer books. Some may be appearing in English for the first time. All prayers (with one exception) are rendered or revised into contemporary English with the hopes that they will be useful in private and corporate worship. Includes prayers from The Antiphonary of Bangor, The Lorrha-Stowe Missal, The Book of Cerne, The Book of Dimma, St. Patrick, St. Columba and many other sources.

Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church is available in paperback through Amazon.com. It is also available for Amazon Kindle.