The Mozarabic Anaphora

Glory and honor be to the Father, and to the + Son, and to the Holy Spirit, now and forever. Amen.

Lift up your hearts.
We lift them up to the Lord.

Let us give praise and thanksgiving to God, and to our Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, who is in heaven.
It is good and right so to do.

It is truly good and right, that we should always give thanks to you, O Holy Lord, everlasting Father, almighty God, … Therefore, with angels and archangels, and with all the company of heaven, we laud and magnify your glorious name, evermore praising you and saying:

Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God of hosts,
heaven and earth are full of the majesty of your glory.
Hosanna to the Son of David;
Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord.

Hagios, Hagios, Hagios, Kyrie ho Theos. (Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God.)

Truly holy and blessed are you,
O God the Father almighty,
for you sent your only Son
to take on himself our nature
and die for the sins of the whole world.
By his cross and passion,
he bore the burden of our sins
and made an end of atoning sacrifices
by that one offering of infinite worth.

Christ the Lord and eternal Redeemer,
the day before he suffered,
on the same night in which he was betrayed,
took bread into his holy and venerable hands,
and giving thanks, blessed, and broke it,
and gave it to his disciples, saying,
“Take, eat, this is my + body, which is given for you.
Do this, as often as you eat it, for a commemoration of me.”
Amen.

Likewise, after supper, he took the cup, saying,
“This is the Cup of the New Testament in my + blood
which is shed for you and for many for the remission of sins.
Do this, as often as you drink it, for a commemoration of me.”
Amen.

Doing this, most holy Father,
with these your holy gifts, which we now offer you, [1]
we show forth the death of your only-begotten Son,
by which we were redeemed,
as he commanded us to do
until he himself should come again,
remembering his glorious passion, resurrection, and ascension,
giving you most hearty thanks
for the innumerable benefits procured to us by the same.

And we most humbly pray that,
by the same Spirit by whom your blessed Son became incarnate for us,
the holy and undivided Trinity
would bless and sanctify these gifts and creatures of bread and wine,
that we, receiving them according to our Savior Jesus Christ’s holy institution,
may be made partakers of his most blessed body and blood.
Amen.

Graciously hear us, O holy Lord our God,
and through these your good gifts sanctified by you,
grant us, your unworthy servants, your blessing to life eternal.
Amen.


Source: From “Through Your Mercy, O Our God…” Prayers from the Mozarabic Church.

[1] In the early church, it was the custom for members of the church to present bread and wine as gifts to be used for the celebration of the Lord’s Supper, which is the “offering” (offerimus) mentioned here. Note that the offering of the bread and wine are the only things spoken of as an offering on the part of worshipers or priest. Also, earlier it is noted that Christ “made an end of atoning sacrifices by that one offering of infinite worth.”

Prayer in Time of Pestilence

O God,
you do not desire the death of sinners,
but you want them to turn to you and live.
Look with pity on the weakness of our mortal nature.
Deliver us from this pestilence.
Do not treat us as our sins deserve,
but look on us in mercy
and return your blessings to us;
through Jesus Christ our Lord.
Amen.

Source: Modified from a Mozarabic Collect.

Home Liturgy for Holy Saturday–Vigil of Easter

There are several traditions for worship on Holy Saturday:

  • The most ancient is the Vigil of Easter in which lessons are read from the Old Testament that prefigure the redemption and resurrection. The mood of the worship is kept very somber. Then when the prophecies have been read, lights are turned up, bells are rung, the Gloria in Excelsis is sung with a festival setting, and the moment of Christ’s resurrection is celebrated. New Christians are baptized, and Holy Communion is celebrated. The Vigil of Easter is considered the first service of Easter.
  • Some traditions read the account of Jesus’ burial on Holy Saturday.
  • Some traditions focus on Jesus’ descent into hell.

This home liturgy combines the themes of Jesus burial (Gospel), Jesus’ descent into hell (1 Peter 3) and how we share in his victory through our baptism into his death and resurrection (prayers and responsory). 

Do you not know that all of us who were baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death?
We were therefore buried with him by this baptism into his death, so that just as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, we too would also walk in a new life.

If we have been united with him in the likeness of his death,
we will certainly also be united with him in the likeness of his resurrection.
(Romans 6:3-5)

Let us pray.

O Lord Jesus Christ,
for our sins you endured the cross and the grave,
and on the third day you rose again from the tomb.
Just as you have cleansed us from our sins by your blood,
and as we are buried with you in baptism,
so by your grace, let us share in your resurrection;
through your mercy,
O our God, you are blessed,
and live and govern all things,
now and forever.
Amen.

Reading

A reading from 1 Peter, chapter 3.

Indeed, it is better, if it is God’s will, to suffer for doing good than for doing evil, 18 because Christ also suffered once for sins in our place, the righteous for the unrighteous, to bring you to God. He was put to death in flesh but was made alive in spirit, 19 in which he also went and made an announcement to the spirits in prison. 20 These spirits disobeyed long ago, when God’s patience was waiting in the days of Noah while the ark was being built. In this ark a few, that is, eight souls, were saved by water. 21 And corresponding to that, baptism now saves you—not the removal of dirt from the body but the guarantee of a good conscience before God through the resurrection of Jesus Christ. 22 He went to heaven and is at the right hand of God, with angels, authorities, and powers made subject to him.

The Word of the Lord.
Thanks be to God.

Gospel

The holy Gospel according to St. John, the 19th chapter.

After this, Joseph of Arimathea, who was a disciple of Jesus, but secretly for fear of the Jews, asked Pilate to let him remove Jesus’ body. When Pilate gave him permission, he came and took Jesus’ body away. 39 Nicodemus, who earlier had come to Jesus at night, also came bringing a mixture of myrrh and aloes, about seventy-two pounds.  40 They took Jesus’ body and bound it with linen strips along with the spices, in accord with Jewish burial customs. 41 There was a garden at the place where Jesus was crucified. And in the garden was a new tomb in which no one had ever been laid. 42 So they laid Jesus there, because it was the Jewish Preparation Day, and the tomb was near.

The Gospel of the Lord.
Praise be to you O Christ. 

Responsory

Christ has been raised from the dead, he will never die again. Death no longer has control over him.
The death he died, he died to sin once and for all, but the life he lives, he lives to God. (Romans:6:9-10)

Christ was handed over to death because of our trespasses and was raised to life because of our justification. (Romans 4:25)
The life he lives, he lives to God. 

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit.
The life he lives, he lives to God. 

The grace of our Lord + Jesus Christ and the love of God and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you all.
Amen.

Christ is risen!
He is risen indeed! Alleluia!

__________

Prayer “O Lord Jesus Christ, for our sins you endured…” is from Mozarabic Collects, ed. Rev. Chas. R. Hale, New York, 1881, p. 25 #3

The responsory is based on the traditional responsory for Easter. The traditional responsory also has Alleluias:

Christ has been raised from the dead, he will never die again. Death no longer has control over him.
The life he lives, he lives to God. Alleluia! Alleluia! (Romans:6:9-10)

Christ was handed over to death because of our trespasses and was raised to life because of our justification. (Romans 4:25)
The life he lives, he lives to God. Alleluia!

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit.
The life he lives, he lives to God. Alleluia!

For this Easter Eve home liturgy, we included only one Alleluia at the end of the rite.

Scripture is taken from The Holy Bible: Evangelical Heritage Version, http://www.wartburgproject.org.

Christian Prayer, Banner

You Are Holy in All Your Works

O Lord Jesus Christ, true God and truly human,
you do not change,
and you are holy in all your works.
Take all unbelief away from us,
and fill us with the gifts of your grace;
through your mercy, O our God,
you are blessed,
and live and govern all things,
now and forever.

Source: Freely modified from Mozarabic Collects, ed. Rev. Chas. R. Hale, New York, 1881, p. 28 #1 (Easter 4)

New from VaterUnser Books: “Through Your Mercy, O Our God…” Prayers from the Mozarabic Church

This book is a collection of prayers from the Mozarabic tradition. The Mozarabs were Christians who lived in Spain under Islamic rule. The prayers in the Mozarabic Rite are free in style and substantial in meaning. Most of the prayers also seem to be very direct in presenting gospel content. They are also very consciously biblical. Some of the Mozarabic prayers also have a definite structure. Sometimes the structure is similar to the parallelism in Hebrew psalms. Some prayers remind me of a modern bullet list. The content, structure and biblical foundation of the prayers give them a special beauty, along with deep meaning.

Available through Amazon for Kindle and in paperback.

VaterUnser Books, black on white

Enlighten Our Eyes

Enlighten our eyes, O Lord,
that our faith may be fixed upon you,
and our souls may take counsel
in the sweetness of your love,
and your fear implant
true penitence in our hearts;
through Jesus Christ our Lord.
Amen.

Source: Mozarabic collect.
Source of this version: Freely modified from Oremus, ed. Paul Zeller Strodach.

Mozarabic, ad.

You Lift Up Our Heads

O Lord,
even though many say
there is no help for us in our God,
you are our defender.
You lift up our heads.
Increase our hope
and surround us with your perpetual mercy;
through Jesus Christ our Lord.
Amen.

Source: Mozarabic collect.

Source of this version: Freely modified from Oremus, ed. Paul Zeller Strodach.

 

Mozarabic, ad.

Crown the Faith of Those Who Cling to You

O God,
Father of your only Son,
you dwell in heaven
and you scoff at those
who rise against your Anointed One.
Grant us special grace
that we may not yield to adversities,
that the unbelief of those who do not know you
may be done away with,
and the faith of those who cling to you
may be crowned.

Source: Mozarabic Rite, 7th Century

Source of this version: Oremus, edited by Paul Zeller Strodach

 

Mozarabic, ad.