Christmas Day (Christmas II)

Almighty God,
grant that we who are are bathed
in the new light of your incarnate Word
may reflect the faith
that shines in our hearts
it in all we do;
through your Son,
Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.

Source: Historic Collect for Christmas Day (Christmas II),  Gregorian, 10th Century.

Source of this version: Newly translated for A Collection of Prayers.

Original in Latin:

Da, quaesumus, omnipotens Deus, ut dum nova incarnati Verbi tui luce perfundimur, hoc in nostro resplendeat opere, quod per fidem fulget in mente.

Bosco Peters gives the original with various translations in this article.

 

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Sunday after Christmas

Almighty and eternal God,
direct our actions with what pleases you,
that in the name of your beloved Son
we may be made to abound in good works;
through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.

Source: Historic Collect for the Sunday after Christmas,  Gregorian, 10th Century

Source of this version: Newly translated for A Collection of Prayers

Original in Latin:

Omnípotens sempitérne Deus, dírige actus nostros in beneplácito tuo, ut in nómine dilécti Fílii tui mereámur bonis opéribus abundáre. Per Dóminum.

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Advent 3

Advent 3

Lord, hear our prayers,
and lighten the darkness of our hearts
by your gracious appearing;
for you live and reign
with the Father and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.

Source: Historic Collect for the Third Sunday in Advent, Gregorian, 10th Century

Source of this version: Newly translated for A Collection of Prayers

Original in Latin:

Aurem tuam, quæsumus, Dómine, précibus nostris accómmoda: et mentis nostræ ténebras, grátia tuæ visitatiónis illústra; Qui vivis…

See this article by Bosco Peters.

 

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Advent 1

Advent 3

Stir up your power, O Lord, and come.
Rescue and protect us
from the threatening perils of our sins by your might;
for you live and reign with the Father and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.

Source: Historic Collect for the First Sunday in Advent, Gregorian, 10th Century

Source of this version: Newly translated for A Collection of Prayers

Original in Latin:

Excita, quaesumus Domine, potentiam tuam, et veni: ut ab imminentibus peccatorum nostrorum periculis, etmereamur protegente eripi, te liberante salvari. Qui vivas et regnas cum Deo Patre in unitate Spiritus Sancti Deus: per omnia saecula saeculorum.

 

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Praise, Thanks, Confession of Faith

Glory be to you, almighty Father,
you have given to those who fear you
the heavenly bread of life,
that we may be mindful of the marvels
which you have done on the earth,
by sending us your only Son,
fully human,
born of a pure virgin.
We give you thanks, holy Father,
for you created us before we were,
and while we were still sinners you made us partakers of your heavenly grace;
through your Son, our Lord and God,
who with you and the Holy Spirit
makes, orders, and rules all things, now and forever. Amen.

Source: Dunstan of Canterbury

Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Middle Ages, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1954.

Confession and Prayer for Forgiveness

O Lord, O King,
magnificent in the stronghold of heaven,
always worthy of praise.
In your grace for your people:
have mercy.

Lord,
to whom the hosts of cherubim sing in endless praise:
have mercy.

Lord,
the heavenly armies sing high praise to you,
and the seraphim reply to them:
have mercy.

O Christ,
enthroned as King above,
whom all orders of angels in their beauty praise without ceasing,
on us, your servants, always:
have mercy.

O Christ,
your one only Church throughout the world sings to you.
The sun, the moon, and stars, the land and sea, always serve you:
have mercy.

O Christ,
your saints, the heirs of the eternal country,
one and all with utter joy proclaim you in a most worthy strain:
have mercy.

O Lord,
O gentle Son of Mary,
O King of Kings,
blessed Redeemer,
on those you have ransomed from the power of death
by your own blood:
have mercy.

O noblest unbegotten, yet begotten Son,
having no beginning of age,
yet excelling all things,
on this your congregation in your pity:
have mercy.

O Sun of Righteousness,
in all unclouded glory,
supreme dispenser of justice,
in that great day when you will come to be our judge,
on this your people, who here stand before your presence,
in your pity:
Lord, then have mercy on us. Amen.

Source: Dunstan of Canterbury
Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Middle Ages, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1954.

Alexander’s Breastplate

This lorica (breastplate) prayer is called “Alexander’s Breastplate” because it is between two poems about Alexander the Great in the Welsh Book of Taliesin.

On the face of the earth
his equal was not born,
Three persons of God,
one gentle Son
in the glorious Trinity.
Son of the Godhead,
Son of the Manhood,
one wonderful Son.
Son of God, a fortress,
Son of the blessed Mary,
Son, Servant, Lord.
Great his destiny,
great God supreme,
in heavenly glory.
Of the race of Adam
and Abraham,
and of the line of David,
the eloquent psalmist,
was he born.
By a word he healed
the blind and deaf
from every ailment;
the gluttonous, vain
iniquitous, vile, perverse,
to rise toward the Trinity
by their redemption.
The Cross of Christ
is our shining breastplate
against every ailment.
Against every hardship
may it certainly be
our city of refuge.

Source: Book of Taliesin, Welsh, 10th-14th Century, excerpt
The Four Ancient Books of Wales, 1868, p. 557-558.

Source of this version: Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church.

 

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