Help, Save, Have Mercy on Us

The Litany of Chrysostom may be read or may be sung to this tune. Sometimes it is sung in a way that the word “Lord” overlaps between the cantor and congregation: “In peace, let us pray to the Lord, have mercy.” Graphics for use in service folders, with or without harmony, are provided below, along with a Word file.

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In peace let us pray to the Lord.
Lord, have mercy.

For the peace from above and for the salvation of our souls, let us pray to the Lord.
Lord, have mercy.

For peace of the whole world, for the well-being of the holy Churches of God, and for the unity of all, let us pray to the Lord.
Lord, have mercy.

For this holy house and for those who enter it with faith, reverence, and the fear of God, let us pray to the Lord.
Lord, have mercy.

For our pastors, teachers, and all who are in the service of Christ, and all the clergy and laity, let us pray to the Lord.
Lord, have mercy.

For our country, the president, all those in public service, and all our armed forces, let us pray to the Lord.
Lord, have mercy.

For this parish and city, for every city and country, and for the faithful who live in them, let us pray to the Lord.
Lord, have mercy.

For favorable weather, for an abundance of the fruits of the earth, and for peaceful times, let us pray to the Lord.
Lord, have mercy.

For those who travel by land, sea and air, for the sick, the suffering, the captives and for their salvation, let us pray to the Lord.
Lord, have mercy.

For our deliverance from all affliction, wrath, danger, and distress, let us pray to the Lord.
Lord, have mercy.

Help us, save us, have mercy on us and protect us, O God, by your grace.
Amen.

Source: The Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom

Source of this version: Modified from  http://www.ocf.org/OrthodoxPage/liturgy/liturgy.html

 

“For our pastors, teachers,…” in the original is “For our Archbishop (Name), our Bishop (Name), the honorable presbyters, the deacons in the service of Christ, and all the clergy and laity, let us pray to the Lord.”

Graphics for use in service folders. Graphics are larger than they need to be for clarity. For use with 11 point type, graphics should be 3.25″ wide.

Printed with harmony:

Lord,_have_mercy

Amen.

…or without harmony:

Lord,_have_mercy2

Amen2

Download the Litany of Chrysostom with music files added as a Microsoft Word document: Litany_of_Chrysostom,_with_music.docx

A Doxology

To the only God invisible,
the Father of truth,
who sent to us
the Savior and prince of immortality,
through whom also he revealed to us
the truth and the heavenly light.
To him be the glory forever and ever. Amen.

Source: Third or fourth century papyrus

Source of this version: The New Archaeological Discoveries and their Bearing upon the New Testament by Camdem McCormick Cobern, Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1918, p. 277

 

Doxology from an Ancient Sermon

He is the Light; therefore is he the Sun of our souls.
He is the Life; therefore we live in him.
He is Holiness; therefore is he the slayer of sin.
He is Salvation ; therefore it is he who has purchased
the whole world with his blood.
He is the Resurrection; therefore it is he who has set free
those who are in the tomb,
and has made them new a second time by his blood.
He is the Way; therefore he is the guide to his Father.
He is the Door; therefore he is the guide into paradise.
He is the Shepherd; therefore he is the seeker after the sheep which is lost.
He is the Lamb; therefore he is the cleanser of the world from its impurity.
This is my God; I will ascribe glory to him,
for to him belong glory and power for all ages and ages. Amen.

Source: Sermon on a papyrus, possibly fourth century

Source of this version: The New Archaeological Discoveries and their Bearing upon the New Testament by Camdem McCormick Cobern, Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1918, p. 289

Who Has Anything but What You Have Given

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O Lord my God, most merciful,
most secret, most present,
most constant, yet changing all things,
never new, and never old,
always in action, yet always quiet,
creating, upholding, and perfecting all,
who has anything but what you have given?
or what can any man say when he speaks about you?
Yet have mercy on us, O Lord,
that we may speak to you, and praise your Name.

Source: Jeremy Taylor, 1613–67 (from St Augustine) in in Daily Prayer.

Taylor’s version, in traditional English:

O LORD my God, most merciful,
Most secret, most present,
Most constant, yet changing all things,
Never new, and never old,
Ever in action, yet ever quiet,
Creating, upholding, and perfecting all,
Who hath anything but of thy gift?
Or what can any man say when he speaketh of thee?
Yet have mercy upon us, O Lord,
that we may speak unto thee, and praise thy Name.

 

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Perfect Love

Grant me, even me, my dearest Lord,
to know you, and love you, and rejoice in you.
And, if I cannot do these perfectly in this life,
let me at least advance to higher degrees every day,
until I can come to do them in perfection.
Let the knowledge of you increase in me here,
that it may be full hereafter.
Let the love of you grow every day more and more here,
that it may be perfect hereafter;
that my joy may be full in you.
I know, O God, that you are a God of truth,
O make good your gracious promises to me,
that my joy may be full;
to your honor and glory,
with the Father and the Holy Spirit you live and reign,
one God, now and forever. Amen.

Source: Augustine of Hippo, Fourth Century

Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Early Church, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1953

 

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The Holy Spirit

O Holy Spirit, Love of God,
pour out your grace,
and descend plentifully into my heart.
Enlighten the dark corners of this neglected dwelling,
and scatter there your cheerful beams.
Dwell in that soul that longs to be your temple.
Water that barren soil, overrun with weeds and briars,
and lost for lack of cultivating,
and make it fruitful with your dew from heaven.
Come, refreshment of those who languish and faint.
Come, Star and Guide of those who sail in the tempestuous sea of the world. You are the only Haven of the tossed and shipwrecked.
Come, Glory and Crown of the living, and only Safeguard of the dying.
Come, Holy Spirit, in your great mercy, and make me fit to receive you. Amen.

Source: Augustine of Hippo, Fourth Century

Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Early Church, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1953

 

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