Give Peace in Our Days

Plainchant of ‘Da Pacem’

Lord, give peace in our days,
for there is no other
who fights for us,
but you, our God.

Source: The text is a 6th or 7th-century hymn based on biblical verses 2 Kings 20:192 Chronicles 20:12,15 and Psalms 72:6–7.

Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Da_pacem,_Domine

Original in Latin:

Da pacem, Domine, in diebus nostris
quia non est alius
qui pugnet pro nobis
nisi tu Deus noster.

https://lyricstranslate.com

The entire hymn appears thus:

Lord, give peace in our days,
for there is no other
who fights for us,
but you, our God.

May there be peace within your fortifications,
prosperity within your citadels. (Psalm 122:7)

Lord, give peace in our days, …

For the sake of my brothers and my friends,
now I will say, “Peace be within you.” (Psalm 122:8)

Lord, give peace in our days, …

For the sake of the house of the Lord our God,
I will seek good for you. (Psalm 122:9)

Lord, give peace in our days, …

Pray for the peace of Jerusalem.
May those who love you prosper. (Psalm 122:6)

Lord, give peace in our days, …

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
as it was in the beginning is now, and will be forever. Amen.

Lord, give peace in our days, …

Deliver Us from Every Evil

Deliver us, Lord, from every evil,
and grant us peace in our day.
In your mercy keep us free from sin
and protect us from all anxiety
as we wait in joyful hope
for the coming of our Savior,
Jesus Christ our Lord.
Amen.

Source: Roman Rite

This prayer is called the “embolism,” a word for a short prayer inserted into another prayer. According to the 1913 Catholic Encyclopedia, “[t]he embolism may date back to the first centuries, since, under various forms, it is found in all the Occidental and in a great many Oriental, particularly Syrian, Liturgies.”

Original in Latin:

Libera nos, quæsumus, Domine, ab omnibus malis, da propitius pacem in diebus nostris, ut, ope misericordiæ tuæ adiuti, et a peccato simus semper liberi, et ab omni perturbatione securi: expectantes beatam spem et adventum Salvatoris nostri Iesu Christi.

This short prayer is often inserted into the Lord’s Prayer in this manner:

Our Father, who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name,
thy kingdom come,
thy will be done
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread;
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those
who trespass against us;
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

Deliver us, Lord, from every evil,
and grant us peace in our day.
In your mercy keep us free from sin
and protect us from all anxiety
as we wait in joyful hope
for the coming of our Savior,
Jesus Christ our Lord.

For thine is the kingdom
and the power and the glory
forever and ever. Amen.