Christ, Our Passover, Has Been Sacrificed

Revelation: Christ and the Angels – Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort  Wayne

Pascha Nostrum is a hymn sometimes used by Christians during Easter season, also known as the “Easter Anthems.” The title is Latin for “Our Passover,” and the text consists of a cento formed from several verses of Scripture: 1 Corinthians 5:7–8, Romans 6:9–11, and 1 Corinthians 15:20–22.

Alleluia.
Christ our Passover has been sacrificed for us;
therefore let us keep the feast,

Not with the old leaven, the leaven of malice and evil,
but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth. Alleluia.

Christ being raised from the dead will never die again;
death no longer has dominion over him.

The death that he died, he died to sin, once for all;
but the life he lives, he lives to God.

So also consider yourselves dead to sin,
and alive to God in Jesus Christ our Lord. Alleluia.

Christ has been raised from the dead,
the first fruits of those who have fallen asleep.

For since by a man came death,
by a man has come also the resurrection of the dead.

For as in Adam all die,
so also in Christ shall all be made alive. Alleluia.

Source: Book of Common Prayer, 1979, adapted from 1 Corinthians 5:7-8; Romans 6:9-11; 1 Corinthians 15:20-22.

Pascha Nostrum is often sung as chant and is included in many hymnals.

“God’s Paschal Lamb” is a metrical paraphrase of Pascha Nostrum.

See Luther’s hymn “Christ Jesus Lay in Death’s Strong Bands” and “We Know that Christ Is Raised” for hymns that incorporate some of the thoughts of Pascha Nostrum.

Listen to Pascha Nostrum sung to a Gregorian tune in Latin. The video has an arrangement of only the first verse.

Pascha nostrum immolátus est Christus, allelúja:
ítaque epulémur in ázymis sinceritátis et veritátis,
allelúja, allelúja, allelúja.

Published by

pastorstratman

Lutheran pastor, liturgical writer and musician serving St. Stephen's in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin.

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