To Do Your Will

O Lord, my God,
to me you are everything good.
Remember me because I am nothing,
I have nothing, and I can do nothing.
You alone are good, just, and holy.
You can do all things,
you accomplish all things,
you fill all things.
Remember your mercies,
and fill my heart with your grace.
You do not want your works to be done in vain.
Do not turn your face away from me.
Do not withdraw your consolation,
lest my soul become as a thirsty land to you.
Teach me, O Lord, to do your will.
Teach me to live worthily and humbly in your sight. 

Source: Thomas à Kempis
Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Middle Ages, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1954.

For Others

I offer up to you my prayers and intercessions,
for those especially who have in any matter hurt,
grieved, or found fault with me,
or who have done me any damage or displeasure.

For all those also whom, at any time,
I may have vexed, troubled, burdened, and scandalized,
by words or deeds, knowingly or in ignorance;
that you would grant us all equally pardon,
for our offences against each other.

Take away from our hearts, O Lord,
all suspiciousness, indignation, wrath, and contention,
and whatsoever may hurt charity, and lessen brotherly love.

Have mercy, O Lord,
have mercy on those who crave your mercy,
give grace to those who stand in need thereof,
and make us grow to enjoy your grace,
and go forward to life eternal. 

Source: Thomas à Kempis
Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Middle Ages, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1954.

My Hope and Refuge

Ah, Lord God,
holy Lover of my soul,
when you come into my soul,
all that is within me will rejoice.
You are my glory and the exultation of my heart.
You are my hope and refuge in the day of my trouble.
Set me free from all evil passions,
and heal my heart of all inordinate affections,
cure and cleanse me within,
that I may be made fit to love,
courageous to suffer,
steady to persevere.
Nothing is sweeter than love,
nothing more courageous,
nothing fuller nor better in heaven and earth;
because love is born of God,
and cannot rest but in God,
above all created things. Let me love you more than myself,
and love myself except for you; and in you all that truly love you,
as the law of love commands,
shining out from yourself. 

Source: Thomas à Kempis
Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Middle Ages, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1954.

Praise

I will say to my God, my Lord, and my King,
“Oh, how abundant is your goodness, O Lord,
which you have stored up for those who fear you.”
But what are you to those who love you?
What are you to those who serve you with their whole heart?
In this especially you have showed me the sweetness of your love;
that when I was not,
you made me,
when I went far astray from you,
you brought me back again, that I might serve you,
and have commanded me to love you.
I wish that I were able,
at least for one day,
to do some worthy service for you.
Truly, you are my Lord,
and I your servant,
bound to serve you with all my might.
This I wish to do, this I desire,
and supply whatever is lacking in me,
I pray.

Source: Thomas à Kempis
Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Middle Ages, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1954.

For Faithful and Prepared Lives

Who can tell what a day may bring forth?
Gracious God,
move us to live every day as if it were to be our last,
for we do not know if it might be.
Cause us to live as if we know it is our last hour.
O grant that we may not die with any guilt on our consciences,
or any known unrepented sin,
but that we may be found in Christ,
who is our only Savior and Redeemer. 

Source: Thomas à Kempis
Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Middle Ages, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1954.

The Quiet Hour

Lord,
I offer to you all my sins and offences,
which I have committed before you,
from that day I first could sin, even to this hour;
that you may consume and burn them,
one and all,
with the fire of your love,
and do away all the stains of my sins,
and cleanse my conscience from all offences,
and restore to me your grace,
fully forgiving me all,
and admitting me mercifully to the kiss of peace.

I offer up also to you all that is good in me,
though it is very small and imperfect,
that you may amend and sanctify it,
that you may make it grateful and acceptable to you,
and always perfect it more and more.

Bring me also,
slothful and unprofitable poor creature as I am,
to a good and blessed end. 

Source: Thomas à Kempis
Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Middle Ages, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1954.

Preserve Us from Cares

My most gracious God,
preserve me from the cares of this life,
so that I should not become entangled by them,
and from the many desires of the flesh,
so that I should not be ensnared by pleasure,
and from whatever is an obstacle to the soul,
so that I should not be broken with troubles,
and be overthrown.
Amen.

Source: Thomas à Kempis

Source of this version: Modified from A Book of Prayers: Together with Psalms and Hymns and Spiritual Songs, Ancient and Modern, Ed. Charles Leffingwell, Morehouse Publishing Company, 1921, p. 20 #1