Will You Guide Me?

220px-sandro_botticelli_050Father, I am seeking:
I am hesitant and uncertain,
but will you, O God,
watch over each step of mine
and guide me?

Source: St. Augustine

Source of this version: http://www.christiancollegeguide.net/article/Guide-Me-God

Also found here: http://www.stjames-coorparoo.org.au/prayer-augustine-on-prayer.html

And here: http://getupwithgod.com/god/sunday-prayer-12/

Graphic by Sandro Botticeli from Wikipedia.com.

 

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A Prayer of the Dying

220px-sandro_botticelli_050O Lord, you suffered all things for me.
Prepare me for your coming again,
that I may be found where you want to find me.
Yours is the glory and the kingdom
with the Father and the Holy Spirit,
now and forever.
Amen.

Source: St. Augustine of Hippo, 354-430

Source of this version: Freely paraphrased from several versions.

Also found here: A Lutheran Prayer Book, ed. Doberstein, © 1960 Muehlenberg Press, Philadelphia

Graphic by Sandro Botticeli from Wikipedia.com.

 

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Clasp Us Close

Come, Lord, work upon us,
set us on fire and clasp us close.
Be fragrant to us.
Draw us to your loveliness.
Let us love, let us run to you.

Source: St. Augustine of Hippo, 354-430

Source of this version: http://www.thebreadboxletters.com/2013/08/be-fragrant-to-us.html

Also found here: The Catholic Prayer Book, © 1986 Servant Books, Cincinnati OH

“Be fragrant to us” may be a reference to Song of Songs 1:3
“Let us run to you” may be a reference to Song of Songs 1:4

 

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Breathe in Me

220px-sandro_botticelli_050Breathe in me, O Holy Spirit,
that my thoughts may all be holy.
Act in me, O Holy Spirit,
that my work, too, may be holy.
Draw my heart, O Holy Spirit,
that I love but what is holy.
Strengthen me, O Holy Spirit,
to defend all that is holy.
Guard me, then, O Holy Spirit,
that I always may be holy.
Amen.

Source: St. Augustine of Hippo, 354-430

Source of this version: https://prayerandverse.com/2016/05/17/make-me-holy/#more-2147

Also found here: http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/prayers/view.cfm?id=1116

Graphic by Sandro Botticeli from Wikipedia.com.

 

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Thanks Leads to Praise

220px-sandro_botticelli_050O my God,
let me, with thanksgiving, remember,
and confess to  you your mercies on me.
Let my bones be drenched with your love,
and let them say to you, ‘Who is like you, O Lord?’
You have broken my bonds,
I will offer to you the sacrifice of thanksgiving.
And how you have broken them, I will declare;
and all who worship you, when they hear this, shall say,
“Blessed be the Lord, in heaven and in earth,
great and wonderful is his name.“

Source: St. Augustine of Hippo, 354-430

Source of this version: Modified from http://www.ccel.org/ccel/augustine/confess.ix.i.html

Also found here: The One Year Book of Personal Prayer, © 1991 Tyndale House Publishers (July 12)

Graphic by Sandro Botticeli from Wikipedia.com.

 

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The Voyage of Life

220px-sandro_botticelli_050

Blessed are your saints, O God and King,
who have traveled over the tempestuous sea of this mortal life,
and have made the harbor of peace and happiness.

Watch over us who are still in our dangerous voyage;
and remember such as lie exposed to the rough storms of trouble and temptations.
Frail is our vessel, and the ocean is wide;
but as in your mercy you have set our course,
so steer the vessel of our life toward the everlasting shore of peace,
and bring us at last to the quiet haven of our heart’s desire,
where you, O our God, are blessed,
and live and reign for ever and ever.

Source: St. Augustine of Hippo, 354-430

Source of this version: Modified from http://www.beliefnet.com/prayers/catholic/guidance/prayer-for-protection.aspx#stAJR5WhwHibqWSQ.99

Also found here: The One Year Book of Personal Prayer, © 1991 Tyndale House Publishers (June 22)

Graphic by Sandro Botticeli from Wikipedia.com.

 

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Keep Watch, Dear Lord

220px-sandro_botticelli_050Keep watch, dear Lord,
with those who wake,
or watch or weep this night,
and give your angels charge over those who sleep.
Tend the sick,
give rest to the weary,
sustain the dying,
calm the suffering,
and pity the distressed;
all for your love’s sake,
O Christ our Redeemer. Amen

Source: Attributed to St. Augustine of Hippo, 354-430

Source of this version: http://parishofcrawley.org/?page_id=54

Also found here: Christian Worship: A Lutheran Hymnal, © 1993 Northwestern Publishing House, Milwaukee, Wisc. U.S.A.

Graphic by Sandro Botticeli from Wikipedia.com.

 

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Late Have I Loved You

220px-sandro_botticelli_050Late have I loved you,
Beauty so ancient and so new,
late have I loved you!

Lo, you were within,
but I outside, seeking there for you,
and upon the shapely things you have made
I rushed headlong,
I, misshapen.
You were with me but I was not with you.
They held me back far from you,
those things which would have no being
were they not in you.

You called, shouted, broke through my deafness;
you flared, blazed, banished my blindness;
you lavished your fragrance,
I gasped, and now I pant for you;
I tasted you, and I hunger and thirst;
you touched me, and I burned for your peace.

Source: St. Augustine of Hippo, 354-430, Confessions, X, 27

Source of this version: http://www.deeper-devotion.net/augustine-confessions.html

Also found here: The Oxford Book of Prayer, ed. Appleton, © 1985, 1992

“Now I pant for you” may be a reference to Psalm 42:1

“I tasted you” may be a reference to Psalm 34:8

Graphic by Sandro Botticeli from Wikipedia.com.

Another version, freely modified from Prayers of the Early Church, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1953

For Illumination

Late have I loved you,
Eternal Truth and Goodness.
Late have I sought you, my Father!
But you did seek me,
and when you shined forth on me,
then I knew you and learned to love you.
I thank you, my Light,
that you have shined on me,
and taught my soul what you wanted me to be,
and turned your face in pity to me.
You, Lord, have become my Hope,
my Comfort, my Strength, my All!
In you my soul rejoices.
The darkness vanished from before my eyes,
and I saw you,
the Son of Righteousness.
When I loved darkness, I did not know you,
but wandered on from night to night.
But you led me out of that blindness.
You took me by the hand and called me to you,
and now I can thank you,
and your mighty voice which has penetrated to my inmost heart. Amen.

 

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The House of My Soul

220px-sandro_botticelli_050O God,
you are the light of every heart that sees you,
the Life of every soul that loves you,
the strength of every mind that seeks you.
Help me to continue steadfast in your holy love.
Be the joy of my heart;
take it all to yourself,
and remain there.
The house of my soul is narrow;
enlarge it that you may enter in.
It is ruinous, O repair it!
It displeases your sight.
I confess it, I know.
But who shall cleanse it,
to whom shall I cry but to you?
Cleanse me from my secret faults, O Lord,
and spare your servant from strange sins.

Source: St. Augustine

Source of this version: Freely modified from  Prayers of the Early Church,  ed.  J. Manning Potts,  The Upper Room, Nashville, Tennessee, © 1953 (Public domain in the U.S.)

Also found here: http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/resources/liturgy/lent/the-house-of-my-soul-is-narrow-st-augustine-of-hippo/

Also quoted in The One Year Book of Personal Prayer, © 1991 Tyndale House Publishers (April 3)

The last two lines quote Psalm 19:12-13

 

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A Blessing of St. Augustine

220px-sandro_botticelli_050Grant, O God, of your mercy, that we may come to everlasting life, and there beholding your glory as it is, may equally say:
Glory to the Father who created us,
Glory to the + Son who redeemed us,
Glory to the Holy Spirit who sanctified us.
Glory to the most high and undivided Trinity, whose works are inseparable, whose kingdom without end abides, from age to age forever. Amen.

Source: a personal prayer of St. Augustine of Hippo, 354-430, in Oden, Ancient Christian Devotional

Also found here: A Lutheran Prayer Book, ed. Doberstein, © 1960 Muhlenberg Press, Philadelphia PA

Graphic by Sandro Botticeli from Wikipedia.com.

 

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