Canticle: Christ Suffered for You (A Song of Christ the Servant)

The canticle Christ Suffered for You (A Song of Christ the Servant) is used in the Roman Liturgy of the Hours in later Evening Prayer on Sundays in Lent.

Christ suffered for you,
leaving you an example,
so that you might follow in his steps.
He committed no sin,
neither was deceit found in his mouth.
When he was reviled,
he did not revile in return;
when he suffered,
he did not threaten,
but continued entrusting himself
to him who judges justly.
He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree,
that we might die to sin
and live to righteousness.
By his wounds you have been healed.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

Source: The Holy Bible: English Standard Version, 1 Peter 2:21-24

Christ_Suffered_for_You2.png

See also: http://www.liturgies.net/Liturgies/Catholic/loh/lent/week1sundayep2.htm

and https://www.churchofengland.org/prayer-worship/worship/texts/daily2/canticles/ntcanticles.aspx#66

Canticle: Alleluia! Salvation and Glory (A Song of the Lamb)

The canticle Alleluia! Salvation and Glory (A Song of the Lamb) is used in the Roman Liturgy of the Hours in Evening Prayer on Sundays.

Alleluia!
Salvation and glory and power belong to our God, Alleluia!
for his judgments are true and just; Alleluia!

Alleluia!
Praise our God, all you his servants, Alleluia!
you who fear him, small and great. Alleluia!

Alleluia!
For the Lord our God the Almighty reigns. Alleluia!
Let us rejoice and exult and give him the glory, Alleluia!

Alleluia!
for the marriage of the Lamb has come, Alleluia!
and his Bride has made herself ready; Alleluia!

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

Source: The Holy Bible: English Standard Version, from Revelation 19:1-7

See also: http://www.liturgies.net/Liturgies/Catholic/loh/advent/week1sundayep2.htm

and https://www.churchofengland.org/prayer-worship/worship/texts/daily2/canticles/ntcanticles.aspx#72

This canticle has some material in common with the canticle Dignus est agnus.

Canticle: Though He Was in the Form of God (The Song of Christ’s Glory)

The canticle Though He Was in the Form of God (The Song of Christ’s Glory) was used in the Roman Liturgy of the Hours in Evening Prayer on Saturdays.

Though he was in the form of God,
Jesus did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped,
but emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant,
being born in the likeness of men.
And being found in human form,
he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death,
even death on a cross.
Therefore God has highly exalted him
and bestowed on him the name that is above every name,
so that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow,
in heaven and on earth and under the earth,
and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord,
to the glory of God the Father.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

Source: The Holy Bible: English Standard Version, Philippians 2:6-11

See also: https://player.fm/series/divine-office-liturgy-of-the-hours-of-the-roman-catholic-church-breviary/aug-06-evening-prayer-for-saturday-of-the-18th-week-of-ordinary-time

and https://www.churchofengland.org/prayer-worship/worship/texts/daily2/canticles/ntcanticles.aspx#61

Canticle: Great and Amazing Are Your Deeds

The canticle Great and Amazing Are Your Deeds is used in the Roman Liturgy of the Hours in Evening Prayer on Fridays.

Great and amazing are your deeds,
O Lord God the Almighty!
Just and true are your ways,
O King of the nations!
Who will not fear, O Lord,
and glorify your name?
For you alone are holy.
All nations will come
and worship you,
for your righteous acts have been revealed.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

Source: The Holy Bible: English Standard Version, Revelation 15:3-4

See also: http://www.liturgies.net/Liturgies/Catholic/loh/advent/week1fridayep.htm

and https://www.churchofengland.org/prayer-worship/worship/texts/daily2/canticles/ntcanticles.aspx#71

This canticle has some material in common with the canticle Dignus est agnus.

Canticle: We Give Thanks to You

The canticle We Give Thanks to You is used in the Roman Liturgy of the Hours in Evening Prayer on Thursdays.

We give thanks to you, Lord God Almighty,
who is and who was,
for you have taken your great power
and begun to reign.
The nations raged,
but your wrath came,
and the time for the dead to be judged,
and for rewarding your servants, the prophets and saints,
and those who fear your name,
both small and great.

Now the salvation and the power
and the kingdom of our God
and the authority of his Christ have come,
for the accuser of our brothers has been thrown down,
who accuses them day and night before our God.
And they have conquered him by the blood of the Lamb
and by the word of their testimony,
for they loved not their lives even unto death.
Therefore, rejoice, O heavens
and you who dwell in them!

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

Source: The Holy Bible: English Standard Version, Revelation 11:17-18, 12:10b-12a

See also: http://www.liturgies.net/Liturgies/Catholic/loh/advent/week1thursdayep.htm

Canticle: Give Thanks to the Father (A Song of Redemption)

The canticle Give Thanks to the Father (A Song of Redemption) is used in the Roman Liturgy of the Hours in Evening Prayer on Wednesdays.

Give thanks to the Father,
who has qualified you to share
in the inheritance of the saints in light.
He has delivered us from the domain of darkness
and transferred us to the kingdom of his beloved Son,
in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins.

He is the image of the invisible God,
the firstborn of all creation.
For by him all things were created,
in heaven and on earth,
visible and invisible,
whether thrones or dominions
or rulers or authorities—
all things were created through him and for him.
And he is before all things,
and in him all things hold together.
And he is the head of the body, the church.
He is the beginning,
the firstborn from the dead,
that in everything he might be preeminent.
For in him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell,
and through him to reconcile to himself all things,
whether on earth or in heaven,
making peace by the blood of his cross.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

Source: The Holy Bible: English Standard Version, Colossians 1:12-20

See also: http://www.liturgies.net/Liturgies/Catholic/loh/advent/week1wednesdayep.htm

and https://www.churchofengland.org/prayer-worship/worship/texts/daily2/canticles/ntcanticles.aspx#62

Canticle: Worthy Are You (Glory and Honor)

The canticle Worthy Are You (Glory and Honor) is used in the Roman Liturgy of the Hours in Evening Prayer on Tuesdays.

Worthy are you, our Lord and God,
to receive glory and honor and power,
for you created all things,
and by your will they existed and were created.

Worthy are you to take the scroll
and to open its seals,
for you were slain, and by your blood you ransomed people for God
from every tribe and language and people and nation,
and you have made them a kingdom and priests to our God,
and they shall reign on the earth.

Worthy is the Lamb who was slain,
to receive power and wealth and wisdom and might
and honor and glory and blessing!

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

Source: The Holy Bible: English Standard Version, Revelation 4:11, 5:9-10, 5:12

See also: http://www.liturgies.net/Liturgies/Catholic/loh/advent/week1tuesdayep.htm

and https://www.churchofengland.org/prayer-worship/worship/texts/daily2/canticles/ntcanticles.aspx#69

This canticle has some material in common with the canticle Dignus est agnus.

A Canticle of Christ (2)

Born as a Son,
led forth as a lamb,
sacrificed as a sheep,
buried as a man,
he rose from the dead as a God,
for he was by nature God and man.

He is all things:
he judges, and so he is law;
he teaches, and so he is wisdom;
he saves, and so he is grace;
he is begotten, and so he is Son;
he suffers, and so he is sacrifice;
he is buried, and so he is man;
he rises again, and so he is God.
This is Jesus Christ,
to whom belongs glory for all ages.

Source: Melito of Sardis, d. 189

Modified from http://www.catholicdoors.com/prayers/english/p00395.htm

A line was omitted after “he saves, and so he is grace” because of possible doctrinal confusion.

Canticle: Blessed be God (A Song of God’s Grace)

The canticle Blessed be God (A Song of God’s Grace) is used in the Roman Liturgy of the Hours in Evening Prayer on Mondays.

Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ,
who has blessed us in Christ
with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places,
even as he chose us in him before the foundation of the world,
that we should be holy and blameless before him.
In love he predestined us for adoption to himself
as sons through Jesus Christ,
according to the purpose of his will,
to the praise of his glorious grace,
with which he has blessed us in the Beloved.
In him we have redemption through his blood,
the forgiveness of our trespasses,
according to the riches of his grace,
which he lavished upon us,
in all wisdom and insight
making known to us the mystery of his will,
according to his purpose,
which he set forth in Christ
as a plan for the fullness of time,
to unite all things in him,
things in heaven and things on earth.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

Source: The Holy Bible: English Standard Version, Ephesians 1:3-10

See also http://www.liturgies.net/Liturgies/Catholic/loh/advent/week1mondayep.htm

and https://www.churchofengland.org/prayer-worship/worship/texts/daily2/canticles/ntcanticles.aspx#65

Canticle: Worthy Is the Lamb

The canticle Dignus est agnus, (Worthy is the Lamb) is taken from Revelation 5:12-13b, 15:3b, 19:5b-6

Worthy is the Lamb who was slain
to receive power and riches and wisdom and strength
and honor and glory and blessing.

To him who sits on the throne and to the Lamb
be blessing and honor and glory and might forever and ever.

Great and marvelous are your works, Lord God Almighty.
Just and true are your ways, King of the Nations.

Who will not fear, O Lord, and glorify your name?
For you alone are holy.

Praise our God, all you his servants
and you who fear him, small and great.

Alleluia! For the Lord our God the Almighty reigns.
Alleluia! Alleluia! Amen.

Source: Common Service Book of the Lutheran Church, revised using phrases from The Holy Bible, Evangelical Heritage Version.

The canticle Dignus est agnus seems to have its origins in American Lutheranism in the late 19th century. It appeared in several service books beginning with the General Synod’s Church Book of 1868.

Dignus

It appears on p. 122 of The Lutheran Hymnal (1941) without music. Earlier books prescribed its use as an option for the main canticle in Matins and Vespers (in place of the Te Deum or Magnificat). Later books suggested it as an alternative song of praise in the Common Service (in place of the Gloria in Excelsis).

In 2000 Years of Classic Christian Prayers, ed. Owen Collins, a similar text is given composed of several Bible verses from Revelation, attributed to Francis of Assisi (d. 1226):

Holy, holy, holy, Lord God Almighty, who was and who is and who is coming. (Revelation 4:8)

Worthy are you, our Lord and God, to receive the glory and the honor and the power, for you have created all things, and because of your will they existed and were created. (Revelation 4:11)

Worthy is the Lamb who was slain to receive power and riches and wisdom and strength and honor and glory and blessing. (Revelation 5:12)

Bless the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit; sing praise to him and highly exalt him forever. (Song of the Three Holy Children)

Praise our God, all you his servants and you who fear him, small and great (Revelation 19:5)

Let every creature that is in heaven and on earth and under the earth and on the sea, and all that is in them say: To him who sits on the throne and to the Lamb be blessing and honor and glory and might forever and ever. (Revelation 5:13)

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit.
Praise him and exalt him above all forever.
As it was in the beginning is now and will be forever.
Amen. Praise him and exalt him above all forever.

An article on Dignus est agnus by John Warwick Montgomery can be read here: http://www.ctsfw.net/media/pdfs/montgomeryhistoricalstudy.pdf

The text of this canticle has been reworked into a new canticle, This Is the Feast of Victory / Worthy Is Christ, by poet John W. Arthur. It first appeared as an anthem for choir, Festival Canticle: Worthy Is Christ with music by Richard W. Hillert, and made its first appearance in a hymnal in Lutheran Book of Worship as an alternative to the Gloria in Excelsis in the Divine Service.

Refrain:
This is the feast of victory for our God.
Alleluia, Alleluia, Alleluia.

1 Worthy is Christ, the Lamb who was slain,
whose blood set us free to be people of God. [Refrain]

2 Power, riches, wisdom and strength,
and honor, blessing and glory are his. [Refrain]

Short interlude…

3 Sing with all the people of God
and join in the hymn of all creation.

4 Blessing, honor, glory and might
be to God and the Lamb forever. Amen. [Refrain]

For the Lamb who was slain
has begun his reign. Alleluia. [Refrain]

© 1978 Lutheran Church in America, The American Lutheran Church, The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, and The Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod

Source: https://hymnary.org/text/worthy_is_christ_the_lamb_who_was?sort=displayTitle

The U. S. Book of Common Prayer (1979) has two canticles that have the same material as “Worthy is the Lamb.” 

A Song to the Lamb Dignus es
Revelation 4:11; 5:9-10, 13

Splendor and honor and kingly power *
___are yours by right, O Lord our God,
For you created everything that is, *
___and by your will they were created and have their being;
And yours by right, O Lamb that was slain, *
___for with your blood you have redeemed for God,
From every family, language, people, and nation, *
___a kingdom of priests to serve our God.
And so, to him who sits upon the throne, *
___and to Christ the Lamb,
Be worship and praise, dominion and splendor, *
___for ever and for evermore.

The Song of the Redeemed Magna et mirabilia 
Revelation 15:3-4

O ruler of the universe, Lord God,
___great deeds are they that you have done, *
___surpassing human understanding.
Your ways are ways of righteousness and truth, *
___O King of all the ages.
Who can fail to do you homage, Lord,
and sing the praises of your Name? *
___for you only are the holy One.
All nations will draw near and fall down before you, *
___because your just and holy works have been revealed.
Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: *
___as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Parts of this canticle are identical with the introit for Christ the King in the Roman rite. This is the Latin text:

Dignus est Agnus, qui occisus est, accipere virtutem, et divinitatem, et sapientiam, et fortitudinem, et honorem.
Ipsi gloria et imperium in saecula saeculorum.
Deus, judicium tuum Regi da: et justitiam tuam Filio Regis.