The Quiet Hour

Lord,
I offer to you all my sins and offences,
which I have committed before you,
from that day I first could sin, even to this hour;
that you may consume and burn them,
one and all,
with the fire of your love,
and do away all the stains of my sins,
and cleanse my conscience from all offences,
and restore to me your grace,
fully forgiving me all,
and admitting me mercifully to the kiss of peace.

I offer up also to you all that is good in me,
though it is very small and imperfect,
that you may amend and sanctify it,
that you may make it grateful and acceptable to you,
and always perfect it more and more.

Bring me also,
slothful and unprofitable poor creature as I am,
to a good and blessed end. 

Source: Thomas à Kempis
Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Middle Ages, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1954.

Remembering Jan Hus

Jan Hus (John Huss) was burned at the stake on July 6, 1415. About a hundred years before Luther, Hus was defending the authority of Scripture, and declaring that where the Word is, the true church is. According to legend, when he was about to be executed he said, “Today you roast a goose. (Hus is the Bohemian word for goose.) But in a hundred years a swan will sing whom you will not be able to silence.” A few of his prayers from the time of his execution have been preserved for us: 

Lord Jesus Christ, I wish to bear most patiently and humbly for your Gospel’s sake and the preaching of your Word, this dire, ignominious, and cruel death.

Have mercy on me, O God, and in you, O Lord, do I put my trust.

O Christ, Son of the living God, have mercy on me.

Lord, into your hands I commend my spirit.

 

Sources: “Lord Jesus Christ, … John Huss, His Life and Teaching after 500 yearsp. 257

“Have mercy on me…” John Huss, His Life and Teaching after 500 yearsp. 256

“O Christ, Son of the living God…” The Life and Times of John Huss, p. 72

“Lord, into your hands…” John Huss, His Life and Teaching after 500 yearsp. 258

 

A Prayer to Follow Christ’s Will

Grant me your grace, most merciful Jesus,
that your grace may be with me,
work in me, and continue with me to the end.

Grant me always
to want and desire whatever is most acceptable to you
and pleases you best.

Let your will be mine,
and let my will always follow yours
and agree perfectly with it.

Let there be between you and me but one will,
so that I may love what you love and abhor what you hate.
Grant that I may die to all things that are in the world
and, for your sake, love to be despised,
and not to be known by the world.
Grant that I may rest in you above all other things,
and that my heart may be at peace in you.

You are the true peace of the heart.
You are its only rest.
Outside of you,
all things are hard and uneasy.

In this peace, the same peace that is in you,
the one sovereign eternal Good,
I will sleep, and I will rest. Amen.

Source: Thomas à Kempis, Imitation of Christ, Book 3
Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Middle Ages, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1954. 2

The last paragraph may be a reference or quote of Psalm 4:8.

Write Your Blessed Name upon My Heart

Write your blessed name, O Lord, upon my heart,
there to remain so indelibly engraved,
that no prosperity,
no adversity shall ever move me from your love.
Be to me a strong tower of defense,
a comforter in tribulation,
a deliverer in distress,
a very present help in trouble
and a guide to heaven
through the many temptations
and dangers of this life. Amen.

Source: Thomas à Kempis
Source of this version: Freely modified from Prayers of the Middle Ages, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1954.