Only Two Weeks until St. Patrick’s Day!

Discover the depths of the Celtic Christians’ faith with these two volumes from the editor of A Collection of Prayers.

Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church

Prayers from the Ancient Celtic Church is a collection of prayers from the time of Patrick (d. ca. 460-493) to the Synod of Whitby (664), and also from the Celtic Christian tradition that remained after Whitby. A few of the prayers in this book may be familiar from their appearance in other prayer books. Some may be appearing in English for the first time. All prayers (with one exception) are rendered or revised into contemporary English with the hopes that they will be useful in private and corporate worship. Includes prayers from The Antiphonary of Bangor, The Lorrha-Stowe Missal, The Book of Cerne, The Book of Dimma, St. Patrick, St. Columba and many other sources.

Available in paperback and Kindle formats from Amazon.com.

The Antiphonary of Bangor and The Divine Offices of Bangor

This book is a new translation of the Antiphonary of Bangor into contemporary liturgical English. The Antiphonary of Bangor is a book of canticles and prayers that were used in Bangor Abbey’s liturgies of the hours with special prayers and elements for Easter Eve, Easter Day, Eastertide, Saturdays and Sundays and on festivals of Martyrs. It was written by hand, sometime around A. D. 680. It is significant for two main reasons. It shows us a worship tradition that developed in a different way than the Roman Rite. While some of the canticles, hymns and prayers in the Antiphonary are also found in the Roman Rite, many are unique. It also shows us some of the theology of the Celtic Christians.

Available in paperback and Kindle formats from Amazon.com.

Published by

pastorstratman

Lutheran pastor serving St. Stephen's in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin.

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